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20121101
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to say one thing. like when does the fbi get involved? >> okay. that's usually the question you ask after you tell the story. but go ahead and do it now. >> in an e-mail. no, i'm serious. >> no, that's all right. >> on an e-mail. if somebody writes a nasty e-mail to me, do i get the fbi involved? >> i don't think you have a lot of classified material on your computer, though, right? >> well, this lady that got the fbi involved, they didn't know at the time. this was a fishing expedition. there are so many questions here that just don't add up. you know what i think we should do first? it's just me. we should read the news. >> that would be great. >> and then you tell me and then i'll ask the question. >> that could be unprecedented. >> i don't like it but i think in this case. >> because then what you say might actually make sense to people. >> you have the person who knows the most about everything, andrea many wa andrea in washington. >> this morning's "new york times," high-up fbi officials uncovered a possible affair involving the new cia director. according to "the times," no one out
of events. on november 2nd, the fbi concluded after the final interview given by paula broadwell that there was no basis for criminal charges. officials tell nbc news that national intelligence director james clapper was told about the investigation the following week, on election day. clapper informed the white house the next day. officials say it was not until thursday, november 8th, however, that president obama was first notified and met with petraeus, who then offered to resign. the president accepted that resignation on friday, the same day that leaders of the house and senate committees first learned of the affair. diane finestein joins me now. congressman, why did you and your colleague on the house side not know about this for all of these months? >> because a decision was made somewhere not to brief us, which is atypical. generally, what we call the four corners, the chair and rankings of both committees are briefed on operationally sensitive matters. this is certainly an operationally sensitive matter. but we weren't briefed. i don't know who made that decision. and i
, and the fbi investigation that turned up evidence of this affair turned up no evidence of breaching classified information, then why did the affair itself get reported to the director of national intelligence and then the security staff at the white house and ultimately the president? this was private misbehavior that was a breach of personnel rules, but not the law. is the fbi the armed wing of the ci acres human resources department? why did the fbi report the affair to anyone. there was no classified information breached here. no reported breach of david petraeus's systems. any e-mail was not his cia e-mail. it was not like the former director who got busted taking home classified information on his home laptop. so this was not a national security matter. and it was not a criminal matter. so why was this brought up to the director of national intelligence by the fbi. we do not know. what we do know is once james clapper, head of the national intelligence, found out about the affair on election day, he urged david petraeus to resign. the following day, wednesday, mr. clapper reportedly notif
of the country's top national security officials. lawmakers in both parties say the fbi failed in its duty to report on the secretive investigation earlier in the process. now, before we get into the debate, here are some of the key allegations and facts about this unusual investigation. first, several months ago, government officials tell nbc news that fbi investigators responded to a complaint about anonymous e-mails sent to jill kelly, a 37-year-old volunteer liaison to mcdill air force base in tampa. kelly and her husband were friends with petraeus and his wife. the fbi began by investigating whether those e-mails constituted harassment. officials told nbc news. then the bureau subsequently found that petraeus' biographer, paula broadwell, was sending those anonymous e-mails that law enforcement officials had dealt with. the investigation also determined she was having an affair with petraeus. the fbi then used that information from the investigation to uncover more details and obtain a warrant to surveil broadwell's e-mail, according to the "wall street journal." so, in september, off
. plus a late-night search by the fbi of paula broadwell's home in charlotte. all of this as we face wide-swinging weather patterns that seem to defy anything we've seen before. breaking new s overnight in the scandal that brought down general petraeus. now the man who oversaw general petraeus in the afghanistan war is under investigation himself. general john allen is accused of "inappropriate communications" with jill kelley, the florida woman whose complaints of e-mail harassment started the initial investigation. a senior defense official traveling with panetta says 20,000 to 30,000 pages of epail and other documents from general allen's communications with kelley are under review. the official says general allen disputes engaging in any wrong doing in the matter. the fbi referred the matter to the department of defense for investigation on sunday. early this morning secretary panetta directed that the defense department's inspector general investigate. last night fbi agents went to the home of biographer paula broadwell, the woman government officials say petraeus acknowledged having
today on the shocking resignation of cia director david petraeus. we have now learned the fbi opened an investigation into his biographer, paula broadwell, for allegedly accessing petraeus' e-mails. all this just a week before the general was set to testify before congress on the benghazi attack. joining me now is greg miller, national security correspondent for "the washington post." greg, what a morning. let's get right to it. i'd like to hear the latest that you've learned. >> well, you know, the big question now is what is the reason for this fbi investigation into this e-mail? and it does look like this is an access to a personal e-mail account. so, this is not a case, as it initially appeared yesterday, of david petraeus coming forward to clear a guilty conscience or something. this is a case where he was flushed out in the open by an fbi investigation that had to do with security. >> okay. now, nbc news has not yet been able to reach paula broadwell for comment, so we haven't confirmed that she is, quote, the woman, but we do know the fbi's investigating her for possibly acces
the experience at one point of having your phone tapped by the fbi. >> it was a home phone. >> once the director of the aclu, director of the washington, d.c., we talked about the petraeus scandal, what had gone on there and the fbi investigating that whole thing. when you say that unfold, there were a lot of questions about whether the fbi had gone too far, in terms of what it did. what was your take on that from the civil liberties point of view. >> well, i think it underscored what i think this is a very serious problem i think we have to deal with. our e-mails are not protected. we all think our own information is protected from the government and at least they need a warrant. but the fact is, the supreme court said a long time ago that if your records are in somebody else's possession, at that time, they were talking about bank records. but if your e-mails are at google or yahoo or wherever, in the cloud somewhere, and they don't have to get a warrant. they just go to the company and say give us the records and most of the times the companies do give the records. we don't know exactly how t
to. >> mike barnicle, you are our crime correspondent. what's fbi director mueller saying this morning? this is, of course, the agent that began the cyber investigation that brought down general petraeus and is about to bring down the top general in afghanistan. he sent this picture to jill kelley who then decided to go to him later on to start a cyber investigation because a woman had sent her an e-mail that said nani, nani pooh-pooh. >> i think based on my knowledge of director mueller, he is probably looking at that picture and looking at the fact that that fbi agent cold called a republican congressman to report what was going on. >> just for the record, he sent this, he says, to doz dozens of people as a joke. >> that's supposed to make us feel better. >> i just said for the record. >> if anthony wiener had only come up with that excuse, he'd still be in congress right now. i tweeted that to all my followers. >> let's wait until all this cools off. they have the ongoing investigation, a month or two down the road. >> yeah. >> let's reassign this agent to, you know, an
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)